Anthony Hall

Question 1.

Across New York, White students were given nearly twice as much access as their Latino and Black peers to a range of key courses in middle and high school in the 2016-17 school year. They were nearly three times as likely to be enrolled in advanced courses like Advanced Placement Math and Science. In Rochester in 2016-17, for example, White students were nearly 5 times more likely to be enrolled in AP or IB courses than Black students and more than 6 times more likely to be enrolled in AP or IB courses than Latino students. How should the Rochester school board address the issue of equitable access to advanced courses?

Answer 1.

“I believe that our students be equipped with the necessary tools/course that their counterpart receives. I will be researching and getting parents/students and teaching staff in this process.”

Question 2.

New York has expanded the ways students can earn a high school diploma. These new rules can provide multiple pathways for students to demonstrate college and career readiness. But they can also be used to “track” students of color, English Language Learners, and students with disabilities into less rigorous coursework and lower graduation standards. How should the Rochester school board address the issue of making sure the high school diploma has real value for all students?

Answer 2.

“I believe that as a board member not only do we have to ensure the best education for our children/students we have to advocate locally and at the state level. We also have a get stakeholders from the business community to hire students coming out of high school.”

Question 3.

New York’s school districts are frequently failing to provide their highest-need schools with significantly greater levels of resources so that all students receive the support they need to succeed. For the 2018-19 school year, most school districts planned relatively little difference in budgeted per-pupil funding levels between their schools that serve the smallest share of low-income students compared to their schools serving the highest share of low-income students. How should the Rochester school board allocate the resources that it controls?

Answer 3.

“Allocation of funds should first be given out equal then do a assessment of schools that need more support and have that funding ready. Assessment fund”

Question 4.

One-third of all New York schools had no Latino or Black teachers in the 2015-16 school year. As a result, more than 115,000 Latino and Black students were enrolled in schools without a single full-time same-race/ethnicity teacher, and nearly half of the state’s White students attended schools without a single full-time Latino or Black teacher. In Rochester, 86% of students were Latino or Black in 2015-16, compared to 18% of teachers. In addition, the least experienced teachers are disproportionately assigned to Rochester’s highest-need high schools. How should the Rochester school board address the issue of improving access to strong, well-supported, and diverse educators?

Answer 4.

“This is a deep rooted issue and not just the board but the community as a whole needs to work on this issue. We have to work with our local government to make Rochester appealing to those that wish to be educators.”

Question 5.

New York schools suspended a student at least once every minute during the 2016-17 school year. During that period, Rochester schools suspended Black students at more than twice the rate of White students. How should the Rochester school board address school discipline?

Answer 5.

“Restorative practices an peer justice but most importantly parents involvement.”

Question 6.

School boards are expected to hold the superintendent accountable for results and rely on the district leadership for day-to-day management of the school system. That requires a clear vision, transparent use of data, and an equity-driven strategic plan for the district’s operations. How should the Rochester school board think about its governance role?

Answer 6.

“I believe teacher should have autonomy and access to resources. Understanding that our District will not thrive without the community at-large thriving,I will be the voice to bring government and community connection together. ‘Building a better Rochester one student at a time'”